CAD Elements Laid Out for You to Understand

Hello, my name is Malcolm and this is my new blog. My friends thought that I was insane when I told them I was going to start a manufacturing blog. However, I'm not insane. I am just massively inspired by a trip I made to my father-in-law's factory. I married into an industrial and manufacturing family who run a number of different plants across the country. When I was brought into the family fold I decided to find out about the industry. It was a fascinating experience and I am really pleased to have had it. I hope you like my blog.

CAD Elements Laid Out for You to Understand

12 April 2021
 Categories: Industrial & Manufacturing, Blog


Just as the name states, computer-aided design (CAD) uses computer software to create technical drawings and designs. It saves you the hustle of drawing these creations by hand and eliminates the chances of human errors. Additionally, introducing different computer software at the design stage hastens the process so that you can focus on reviewing your creation and getting it right.

There are different techniques and software application you can use for both two- and three-dimensional CAD designs. If you have no idea where to start on this subject, the following piece will help you understand:

Where to Use CAD

It helps to understand the instances where you can apply CAD to your advantage. Primarily, CAD is a component of digital product developments used by designers and engineers in the initial stages of a product's life cycle. You can use CAD to make products for computer-aided manufacturing and CNC machines. CAD also comes in handy for motion simulations and photorealistic rendering.

CAD Types

There are different types of CAD to meet your applications' needs. The first one is low-end two-dimensional systems with several open-source and free programs. Usually, the two-dimensional programs are simple to use with fast delivery times. They eliminate all the fuss about placement and scale on the initial drawing sheet. You can adjust both elements when you are working on the final creation.

Three-dimensional CAD modelling is more advanced and slightly complex. It is based on the two-dimensional drafting wireframes but requires manual insertion of the lines into the drawing. Unlike a two-dimensional design, the 3D model doesn't let you add features such as holes directly. 3D models do not have mass properties, so the designer has to use the primary wireframe to come up with the final engineering product. 

The Features You Need

You can only make the most of a technological product if you choose the right thing for your job. When selecting CAD software, make sure you go for one with hundreds of examples and templates. You can easily stumble on something similar to your desired project and customise it into what you want. Secondly, you also need software with intelligent tools and features. For instance, they should allow the designer to types wall dimensions into a dimension label. The same should apply to angles that would be difficult to adjust by moving pointers on a screen. Lastly, go for something that allows you to set a common architectural standard. 

Contact a local CAD service to learn more.

About Me
Malcolm's Manufacturing Blog

Hello, my name is Malcolm and this is my new blog. My friends thought that I was insane when I told them I was going to start a manufacturing blog. However, I'm not insane. I am just massively inspired by a trip I made to my father-in-law's factory. I married into an industrial and manufacturing family who run a number of different plants across the country. When I was brought into the family fold I decided to find out about the industry. It was a fascinating experience and I am really pleased to have had it. I hope you like my blog.

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